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ADF Technopagans
A Community Page for the ADF Technopagan SIG
dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
This idea has been floating around in my head for a long while. I know I have even spoken to a couple of you about it.

I have wanted to try an email spell/magic experiment for awhile. What I envision is this, I will create a unique email address to which anyone who chooses can send prayers, charms, good thoughts, pictures, or what have you to. Yes, I mean an actual email. Ideally while creating this email you would try to imbue it with intention, power, and good mojo. At a specific time I will do a short ritual (not yet written) and delete this email account.

Here is what I am hoping to achieve. Over time the amassed power, intention, mojo etc. builds until, ritually, we will release it into the universe. I have no idea how (or if) it will work but since the idea is still bouncing around in my head after nearly two years I figured I would give voice to it.

The current ADF elections seemed like the perfect time to give it a try. As you know this is a big time for ADF. We will be installing a new Archdruid this year, Ordaining our first priest through the Study Program model, and welcoming new faces into our Mother Grove. These new leaders are going to need our support. Both spiritually and physically.

I am asking you to send your prayers, energy, intention, wishes of good luck, and love not to those members running for office specifically (although that is a grand idea as well) but to the universe. Let us be active participants in enacting ADF's bright future. Anything sent to this email address will not be read (not by human eyes anyways) but, if you wish, you may feel free to share them yourself on the ADF-Technopagan SIG e-list, here on the LiveJournal, or on your various journals and blogs online.

Please send these emails to adfbrightfuture@live.com by April 30th 2010.

I will send more details about how the ritual to end this experiment will go when we get closer to the date (and once I figure out what we are going to do).

Thanks!
~ Jamie
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dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
Many people have found value in holding vigil though the night around the winter solstice. Some people prefer to greet the rising sun on the actual solstice day but for myself I have for the past several years preferred to stay up on the longest night, the night of the Winter Solstice, and greet the sun on the next day when the light begins to increase. Of course this increase is impossible to notice with our naked senses, we need some kind of measuring system to notice the slight change. Which makes it all that more amazing, to me, how many ancient cultures acknowledged, measured, and celebrated the growing light in some way.

The vigil has always represented to me a desire to stand up to darkness. I surround myself with the flickering flame of many candles and other lights when the darkness, literally, lays most heavily upon the land. My goal is to both acknowledge the darkness but to also "live" through it. To say to the universe, "I am here!"

It is also about hope. In the morning the sun is reborn as it is every year. From this day forward the light increases every day until the Summer Solstice. We once again find ourselves in the "In between." We are literally living though the darkest times of winter, with months yet to go until the spring, and yet our first indication that the winter will end is upon us. A reason to hope, and celebrate, indeed.

The Longest NightCollapse )

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caelesti
adf_technopagan
caelesti
Hi there, I'm Caelesti. I'm not really that much of a techie, but I do like to adapt polytheist worship to a postmodern urban American setting, and to my local climate/ecology (Twin Cities, Minnesota) I think that's kind of along the same lines as what you guys are doing. I enjoyed Jamie's recent podcast segment on Technopaganism. Only thing is I didn't catch the url of the site you mentioned that had modern images of the Greek gods.

However someone just posted this to the Hellenic list of some more such images:
http://news.cnet.com/2300-1023_3-10001400-1.html?tag=mncol
Enjoy!
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kallisti
adf_technopagan
kallisti
Greetings:

I have just joined this ADF SIG...and since I am an active LJer, figured I should introduce myself here.

Computers love me...I really meant that. I can coax a computer into running with all sorts of things that are broken. I used to do on-site tech support, and once place had me stay  for an hour because every time I fix their accounting system, it would work fine while I was there, they could do all sort of tests, and no problems. 5 minutes after I walk out, it would crash. So they at one point asked me to stay an hour so that they could get their payroll done. I stayed, it worked, and then died after I left.

I had one theory, I don't know if it really holds water....It may be the crystals in the computer...some people who  are "walking glitches" tend to put the crystals out   wack...whereas I, with my natural sense of rythem, allow them to be perfectly in tune, and work wonderfully. Yes, I am a musician as well.

That's an old theory, haven't come up with a better one.

In most local pagan commuities I am known as The TechnoDruid. I was called that when I was with Silver Fox Grove,   and I am now called that as part of Red Maple Grove.

ttyl
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dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
This is a great video from the TED Conference (Technology, Entertainment, Design) in which Seth Godin talks about his view of technology, specifically the internet, and how it has enabled us to create Tribes and bring real change to the world.

http://www.ted.com/index.php/talks/seth_godin_on_the_tribes_we_lead.html
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dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
The NYC group "Improv Everywhere", well known for their unusual and interesting improv missions that take place among the public, completed a mission in March called "The Subway Art Gallery" where they chose to randomly create an art gallery on a subway platform near the Chelsea neighborhood in Manhattan. They wrote up descriptions of the "art" which was all things already located on the platform. Things like trashcans, telephones, advertisements, even electrical lines. They had their "inside" people show up throughout the event dressed up like a legitimate art opening. They even had a bar, coat rack, and a cellist.



What caught my eye was the reactions of some of the "agents" that took part in the mission.

From Agent Eppink:
"This may seem like a silly exercise, but I think it can be pretty useful! It puts you in a position to re-examine the mundane, imagine others’ intentions, and create new contexts for the objects and ideas you encounter every day. Usually we would just call that “acting”, but in this case, so much of the pretending is internal that maybe it’s not exactly theater? I’m sure there’s an argument for both sides. Regardless, I found the gallery opening to be an exhilarating, tremendously creative experience, and the hundreds of people who passed through, even if they didn’t join, at least encountered a fun, unexpected, disorienting moment."

Agent Small:
"In the course of making the art labels, the mundane stuff of the platform really did become weirdly compelling and beautiful. I wasn’t sure if everyone else would have that experience, or if we would be busy consciously pretending that these random objects were art. In the course of the event, some other friends who came made brilliant observations about the pieces that helped bring my mindset firmly back into of-course-this-is-art, rather than viewing the subway as a collection of quick fixes over time. It’s wonderful how we can decide to create a collective reality, and how it can sometimes catch us up within itself."

Agent Linquist:
"I think my favorite piece of the evening was the performance art titled “Woman sitting on bench, ongoing.” It was great to watch the people not involved in the mission sitting on the bench watching us watch them. Where did life end, and art begin? Where did art end, and life begin? The people sitting were totally confused. Finally, one woman looked up at the placard behind the bench, chuckled a bit and got up. The look on her face when she discovered that she was a performance artist was amazing!"

I am a fan of "Improv Everywhere" but some of their missions are really just designed to mind-fuck people. Like when they shopped in a Home Depot in slow motion or political like when a bunch of men shopped in the Abercrombie and Fitch store shirtless (imitating the model who is posted shirtless outside the store). But this one is really cool. There was, actually, some confusion of passers-by but at the same time they also appeared to have caused a true and honest shift in the way they viewed their world. Finding the beauty and inspiration in the world around, including the man-made, is an incredibly important part of my life. I only wish I could have seen the exhibit myself.

click here for more info on the Subway Art Gallery Opening Mission
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dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
For those of you who do not read The Wild Hunt, Jason put up an interesting article about using one's iPhone for Spells and Tarot today that I thought you may enjoy. You can read that article here: http://wildhunt.org/blog/2009/02/the-apple-iphone-the-newest-ritual-tool.html
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dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
I decided I wanted a little spring on my PC as a reminder over the next couple months of what is to come.


x-posted to my personal journal.
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dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
One of the more interesting concepts in Our Druidry, and one that often goes right over my head, is the way we can use language to understand culture.

For instance, one of our most important concepts is the idea of a "gift for a gift" it is on this understanding that we currently base our entire ritual structure. Our Core Order of Ritual can be divided into two sections. We offer to the Kindreds and then open ourselves to the return flow of their blessings. This type of relationship can be seen in mythology and folklore but can also be seen in the reconstruction of Proto-Indo-European (PIE) language. We see that in many cultures the words for "give/distribute" are very similar to the words in other cultures for "take/receive". "Take for instance the root do of Latin donre means “to give” in most dialects but in Hittite means “to take.” The root nem- is “to distribute” in Greek (NEMESIS), but in German it means “to take,” and the cognate of English GIVE (ghabh-) has the meaning “to take” in Irish."

This is most clearly expressed in a word many of you ADFers may be familiar with in the word that means both guest and host, "ghos-ti- in Indo-European times was the person with whom one had mutual obligations of hospitality. But he was also the stranger, and the stranger in an uncertain and warring tribal society may well be hostile: the Latin cognate hostis means “enemy.”

The idea of these types of exercises is that in reconstructing words that have survived in existing (or more recently extinct) Indo-European languages we can understand how important these concepts were in Proto-Indo-European culture. For instance we can make an educated assumption that women in PIE were considered an essential part of the tribe or group because of the PIE word swesor- (sister) which includes the word for women *esor and the root word that designates "self" or "one's own group"; s(w)e.

Using this same process we also learn the technology and fabrication where important in PIE culture. The root word teks- for example, which means to fabricate or to create. Another is also the root word dheigh-, "meaning “to mold, shape,” is applied both to bread (DOUGH) and to mud or clay, whence words for both pottery and mud walls (Iranian *pari-daiza-, “walled around,” borrowed into Greek as the word that became English PARADISE.)"

We also know that metal and metallurgy were known in PIE cultures due to the word *ayes-, which applied to copper or bronze. Iron working, of course, came later and the words for it vary from culture to culture. But words have been reconstructed for Gold (ghel-) and Silver (arg-) which use was nearly always ceremonial or economic.

The wheel was most likely a late discovery in PIE culture. Archeological finds place the wheel in the earliest of Indo-Eurpoean cultures but the words themselves are most often metaphors, "most terms relating to wheeled vehicles seem to be metaphors formed from already existing words, rather than original, unanalyzable ones. So NAVE, or hub of the wheel (nobh-), is the same word as NAVEL. This is clearly the case with WHEEL itself, where the widespread *k-w(e)-k w l-o- is an expressive derivative of a verb (kel-1) meaning “to revolve or go around.” Other words for “wheel” are dialectal and again derivative, such as Latin rota from a verbal root ret-, 'to run.'"

Besides being interesting, these examinations tell us other things about PIE cultures, and the Indo-European cultures that came later. The acts of creating or fabricating were important enough to the cultures that distinct language was created for them and these same root words have remained even unto today. From my perspective, knowing that these ancient cultures accepted and even honored the technological aspects or their life give me a sense that honoring our own technology is in line with Indo-European thought. Part of our mission continues to be to find ways to make that honor a reality in a spiritually moving way.

Until Then, and Always
~ Dubhlainn


Source: "Indo-European and the Indo-Europeans" by Calvert Watkins
Posted at: http://www.bartleby.com/61/8.html
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dubhlainn
adf_technopagan
dubhlainn
We tend to romanticize that the Ancient Indo-Europeans lived a simple life. I know in my own imagination that the kings and heroes I have read about live in large dwelling places with no one else around and separated by wilderness from their nearest neighbors. I imagine the producers eking out a living, battling the elements and ever encroaching forest. I have the same mental image of Appalachian settlers in the US. We do know that this image is untrue. Most Celts, for instance, lived in farming villages. This is where the population gathered together for protection and comfort with agricultural land surrounding the village proper. Smaller settlements were often linked together with larger towns which would have been the center of culture and entertainment. In fact the lone farmer who lived far away from his neighbors on his lonely farm would probably have been a rarity in Ancient society. And living in the wild unheard of. Which might explain why tales of those who reportedly did, like the Fianna warriors, would have captured the imagination of the people. Well traveled roadways throughout the continent attest to the mobility of the ancients, and fortified cities and temples along these roadways suggest a culture much more advanced than the primitive, barbaric hordes we all were taught existed before the machine that was Rome entered into the picture. A culture that was complex with distinct styles and modes of dress and adornment for varying tribes and castes within each society. Gaulish men, for instance, were known to spike their hair and bleach it to almost white in color. Other peoples had elaborate tattoos. Their technology was some of the best in the world, especially in regards to metal work and art. It was their superior Iron weapons, in fact, that made many IE societies a force to be reckoned with.

What does all of this have to do with Technopaganism? When we allow our romantic notions of how the ancients lived to prevail over archaeological evidence we often end up with a honorable, but primitive, picture. Living as one with nature and eschewing the evils of society and technology. Too often we raise this false image up as part of what it means to recapture the pagan soul. Technopaganism, in our tradition, should take a different approach. One that says that culture, technology, society, and yes my friends even fashion was exceedingly important to the ancients. And as such honoring those same concepts in our own lives, deliberately, thoughtfully, and spiritually, is in line with ancient thought and an authentic concept of what it means to be pagan.

~ Dubhlainn
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